Blog

Image Affordance: Are we seeing the same thing?

"It's not what you look at, it's what you see."

“It’s not what you look at, it’s what you see.”

When you look at any one of my photographs your perception of the image includes all of your life experiences and that of human history.

Yes, everything you’ve seen and learned, every innate survival instinct, and all of the connections you have to anything within the image is instantly brought forth by your brain so that the image can be understood.

It’s not that I believe that my images are the only ones to include all of this, every image does. In the field of visual communication, this is known as image affordance.

This was a new term to me six months ago. I took a class called Visual Communication. Our text was Visual Intelligence: Perception, Image, and Manipulation in Visual Communication, by Ann Marie Seward Barry. In it, the author states that, “Affordances expressed within images become keys to understanding. Transfer of meaning from artist to viewer relies on a common sharing of perceptual process and image affordance.” (Barry, Visual Intelligence, 1997)

From the moment of creation an image is a shared experiential representation of that moment and an individual interpretation that incorporates the reader’s relationships with the symbolism, history, and reality. Image affordance in visual communication relies on our collective experiences to assure that an image is understood.

It’s like this; we know that an image of a hot fudge sundae is not an actual hot fudge sundae, but because many viewers will have had the experience of eating a hot fudge sundae, the image can have the power to affect us physiologically, making us salivate or feel hungry. Affordance assure that this is an image of a food item that though presented two-dimensionally in media, the item is not flat, is likely rounded in shape, that the ice cream is cold and the fudge is hot. To the artist who created the image, the experience is different. Although they, too, may salivate when they view the image, the photographer’s additional experience of creating the image adds a dimension. It’s possible that the photographer took the photo of the hot fudge sundae but could not eat it. Perhaps the scene was set up by a food stylist and what appears to be vanilla ice cream is really mashed potatoes. The resulting image, however, remains intact in its intention and is only successful if the viewer knows what it is, or thinks they know what it is. Other affordances that might play a role in a viewer’s understanding of this type of image may include the viewer’s tendency to exaggerate size of a desired food or the presumed knowledge of the functions of retail ice cream shops, where to go, how to order, that it requires money; all are attributes that are present in the environment and necessary in understanding the image.

In discussing image affordance, declaring what is “necessary” to understand the purpose or context of an image, we must also realize that a viewer has to perceive an affordance exists in order to move to the next logical thought. In Don Norman’s book, The Design of Everyday Things: Revised & Expanded Edition, he attempts to clarify, “Affordances refer to the potential actions that are possible but these are easily discoverable if they are perceivable: perceived affordances. It is the signifier component of the perceived affordance that allows people to determine the possible actions.” (Norman, 2013)

As a photographer, I have been aware of the multiple possibilities of a viewer’s connection to an image I had created, but hadn’t been familiar with the term “image affordance.” A few years ago, I was in Mexico and saw a blue kayak on the beach and took a photo of it. When I see the photo now, I recall my experience taking the photo; my bare feet in the hot sand, my daughter just out of range, playing in the water, how we got to the beach by golf cart, had lunch at a great little restaurant on the on the beach and how I liked how the shadow of the palm tree seemed to touch the end of the kayak. I don’t have any particular affinity to kayaks or kayaking and couldn’t tell you anything about the one in the photo, except that I knew it was a kayak.

Blue kayak on Mexican beach

Blue kayak on Mexican beach

A viewer’s connection to the photo is likely to be very different. It is possible that the viewer reads this image with fear of water or with years of kayaking experience. It could spark emotions of anxiety or envy. Regardless of the emotions related to a scene like this one, a viewer would have to be aware of the perceived affordance, knowing what a kayak is and what it does, before any other attributes can be considered. Someone like me would see the sand, crystal water, the shadow of what is assumed to be a palm tree way before the kayak.

Visual intelligence digs deep into the potential for understanding any image. It brings with it question of culture and significance that go beyond the physical “thing” portrayed, making it a layered, complex influence on our existence.

When viewing an image through the lens of visual intelligence, with the knowledge of image affordance, an image of a hot fudge sundae or a kayak on a beach becomes much more. It becomes a tool to communicate a place in history – as in “oh remember when they used to put HOT FUDGE on ice cream?!” (this, in a few decades when hot fudge is banned). It’s a mutual understanding or a shared experience symbol. Our eyes perceive very quickly and our brains process with impressive accuracy, with no active attention on our part. Queues within images we see are immediately and often unconsciously interpreted. Image affordance fast forwards our brains to help us understand everything we can from an image without having to relearn every time.

Image affordance is a visual communication concept that can change the way you frame, shoot, and market your images.

Take a new look through the images you see every day. What must be understood for the image to be understood? A door? (navigation) Swimming pool? (recreation)  Grocery store? (merchandising) Interior of an airplane? (transportation).

Barry, A. M. (1997). Visual Intelligence. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Barry, A. M. (n.d.). Visual Intelligence: Perception, Image, and Manipulation in Visual Communication.

Norman, D. (2013). The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition.

Goals for 2016: Photography, writing, and business

Mirrors on the wall

Mirrors on the wall – my kind of selfie

It’s New Year’s Day 2016. Today we flip the calendar page and begin another year. Here in Maine, the weather has been mild in December. Until this week’s storm, we had no snow. I believe I join many who would be just fine without snow, or cold, and could roll right into spring from here.

Rose bloom in June sunset

Rose bloom in June sunset

I must admit that I’ve been a poor blogger this year. I could run through a list of the whys…full time job, back to school to finish a degree I began so many years ago, full time husband, daughter, home, and life. I really could go on but with some analysis, it’s a list of blessings. I’m busy but its good busy. Family activities, a daughter who has musical talent, volunteers, belongs to clubs at school, and gets good grades is all good busy. Health and home are okay. Neither is new and both could use a tune up of sorts but are okay.

So I’ve got a million excuses and none at all.

I owe it to readers to do the work. With that in mind I’ve created a list of goals for the New Year. I’d be thrilled if readers held me to task although I recognize that’s not your role. If you’re going to take the time out of your own busy lives to bother to read my writing and view my photographs, I owe it to you to write something worth reading, make photos worth viewing, and back it up with information that’s useful to you.

Here’s my list of professional goals* for 2016:

  1. Write more.
  2. Shoot more.
  3. Process more.
  4. Share more.
  5. Read more.
  6. Learn more.
  7. Travel more.
  8. More into my portfolio.
  9. More on Etsy.
  10. More on stock sites.

 

WRITE MORE.    Regular daily correspondence like writing email replies and drafting papers for my classes doesn’t count here. In Stephen King’s book “On Writing” his suggestion is to write 1000 words a day.  Trying to be realistic about what I can accomplish is the best way for me to actually accomplish anything. I’m not sure if I could write 1000 words per day. To clarify, brevity has never been my strongest attribute. Writing 1000 words is pretty easy for me-the writing part-it’s taking the time to do it that’s in question.

SHOOT MORE.  In the past, I’ve done projects like Photo 365, where you take and post a photo per day. I wanted something to drive me to shoot on a daily basis. Mostly I ended up with a bunch of photos from my daily routine. Maybe the “find beauty in everyday things” concept could be at play here but my experience was mixed on this. While I did shoot more I didn’t end up with any astounding photos from the experiment. For me, the best photos come out of an excursion of sorts. Take my daughter for a hike and get this…

Fields Pond evening

Fields Pond evening light in autumn

 

Or go out looking for something to fill a course project and get this…

Rain drops close up

Rain drops close up

Maybe you get the idea. It’s not so much that I need to plan each shot because once I head out, camera in hand, I can always find something good. Maybe this goal is really part of goal # 7, even if the travel is to my backyard. Much good has come out of traveling to my backyard with the intent to shoot.

Sunflower Close up

Sunflower Close up

 

Coneflower forest

Coneflower forest

 

PROCESS MORE. Shoot more means that there’s more to download, sort through, edit, add metadata, size, resize, rename, etc etc. It’s not enough to shoot stuff. I need to take the next steps. I currently use Adobe Bridge and Photoshop to manage and edit my photos. I have a 1TB external hard drive that houses photos from the past two years, with room for more. I should consider whether adding Lightroom to the workflow would be a good investment for me. Beyond processing images, see Goal #’s 4, 8, 9, & 10. Each of those has a series of steps that are needed to take it from my computer or hard drive to the viewer or buyer.

SHARE MORE. Everybody shares stuff, right? Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Pinterest,  Twitter… there’s the worldwide, online sharing like that and there’s smaller circle sharing. Neither of which I’m very good at. It’s not that I don’t want to share. It’s back to the issue of taking the time to do it. My mother says “you shoot a lot but we never see the pictures!” She’s talking here of the stuff I shoot at family gatherings, Christmas, Thanksgiving, Baby showers, etc. And she’s right. I’m not good at sharing. She wants tangible photos she can hold in her hands and show her friends. She’s 83. I get it. For the social media part of sharing, I find myself with a few concerns on this. One is that putting my photos out there makes them somewhat vulnerable. If I want to be able to sell a photo as stock or as art, it can’t be available for free somewhere. On the other hand, if no one knows that an image exists, how would they know that they need it for their next big project?

I’m going to stick with a sort of general goal of sharing more and work to define what it means for my business.

READ MORE, LEARN MORE, TRAVEL MORE. Not intended to be lumped together as the same thing, these three goals are outside of the daily frame of business but do directly impact the work I do. Jimmy Buffett’s advice to new graduates in 2015 was to “read as much as possible and travel as much as possible”. Reading and traveling open you up to new possibilities and ideas. Travel for me is a direct path to shooting more as I generally wouldn’t go anywhere without my camera. Both lend themselves to the goal of learning more. As I mentioned at the start, I’m taking classes and working towards a degree in Mass Communication so each semester brings a new round of books, assignments, writing, reading, and interaction with other students on some level. While some of the classes may not directly impact my photography and writing, some do. I just completed a course in Visual Communication which I thought would be easy for me to do but truly challenged the way I see things and broadened my understanding of the visual world. I’ll be sharing some of the ideas from the course here on my blog in the coming months. So read, travel, learn — intertwined and important to me.

New York City architecture

New York City architecture

 

MORE ON MY PORTFOLIO, ON ETSY, ON STOCK SITES…I’m not taking a shortcut on these, just trying to avoid being repetitive as all three have had the same issues for me. All three link back to the goal of processing more. They come after the shooting and processing and require the next steps of selection, sizing, metadata, and posting. My portfolio here has many photos and is used for transmittal to clients. While its utility is a necessary tool in this business, presenting much more than a hard copy book can do, it, too requires time and effort on my part, something which has proved to be a problem for me. It’s the same with Etsy; while the result is beneficial to me, the process is cumbersome and time consuming. Stock sites can be a great form of passive income but again, require time and effort.

antique trucks autumn

Antique trucks in autumn in Bradley Maine – applied dry brush filter

They say that if you want to be held to a commitment, tell people about it. Want to quit smoking? Tell everyone around you that you want to do it and you’ll be encouraged to stick with it and embarrassed to cave in. (of course this could lead to secretive behaviors which could lead to more secretive behaviors, sneaking out for a smoke, trying to perfume away the scent, and generally lead down a dark path, but that’s not going to happen to me, right?)

So, if you’re reading this, if you got this far (1401 words) thank you. If you’re reading this and have any suggestions, solutions, or just want to commiserate, please leave a comment. Support is always welcomed. I’ll even take criticism, but please go easy on me.

Good luck with your own goals for the freshly minted New Year!

Maine coon cat silver tabby

Maine coon cat silver tabby close up – Belle

Color Crazed: Some thoughts on color theory and use

 

Magnified detail of colored pencils

Magnified detail of colored pencils

I’m not sure what constitutes a healthy obsession. I’ve never been good with those kinds of boundaries. Maybe it’s my way to battle the gray winter sky. Lately the pull of color is like the tide. I can’t help myself.  It’s a desperate longing that borders on compulsion.

Colored pencils orange green blue

Colored pencils orange green blue

As far back as my visual memory goes there is color. Blocks of color tied to periods of my life. Pale yellow and light purple: early high school. Black & white accented by pink turquoise & purple, that was college. Pink & teal, my first wedding. The 80s. Hot pink, orange and lime, my second wedding. The grounding colors of the earth- browns, terra cotta, mustard…the first floor of my home. Topped by airy colors of periwinkle, Caribbean blues and garden green live with us on the second floor.

Colored pencils in blues

Colored pencils in blues



By now you’re saying “enough already I get it you’re driven by color”. Oh yes. I am. Combinations. Stripes. Scattered messes. Clothes hanging on the store racks. Rainbows of paint chips at the hardware store. Of colored pencils. Of colored pencil shavings even!



I thought I’d take a few minutes and share some of my colorful vision with you.

 

 

I decided to do a little research on how we are effected by color and what colors have become to us. In the process of sharing what I’ve learned, I will also be presenting some new work as part of this study.

 

Recognize it or not, color impacts our lives daily.

Holidays and seasons are queued by colors … Orange and black or red and green. Pinks and reds for Valentine’s Day. They signal that there’s a shift, even it it’s a shift in what’s in stock on the store shelves.

This photo, as an example, is pretty simple. It’s a cup of tea. Sort of generic cup on a bamboo mat with green flowers.

Cup of tea on bamboo mat with green

Cup of tea on bamboo mat with green

Same cup of tea…..

Place it on a red mat and toss in some berries….

 

Cup of tea for holiday

Cup of tea for holiday

 

Now it’s got a holiday feeling to it. In American culture – and color and culture are close relations in symbolism – this signals Christmas.

Cup of tea in spa

Cup of tea in spa

Same cup of tea, add rocks, a fluffy white towel, and a running bath and its got more of a spa and relaxation feeling to it.

 

Colored pencils in rainbow

Colored pencils in rainbow

 

Think about the advertising you see every day. Watch the subtle but calculated notes that will appear over the coming weeks. It’s September now and the leaves have barely begun to change color here in Maine. Within a few weeks, however, we’ll got from fresh green and blues to russet and ambers, then to deep reds, then to the orange and black Halloween colors. I don’t just mean that nature’s coloring will change. The visuals presented to us in television and online advertising will change often sooner than the leaves do, all to prompt us into the next season’s purchases, whether it’s food, clothing, gifts, decorations, or sentiment, marketing is one step ahead of us.

 

Colorful Vegetable Display

Colorful Vegetable Display

Harvest season…back to school shopping, a time for preparing for the long winter ahead, right?

Christmas presents and ornaments

Christmas presents and ornaments

These colors of purple and pink may not be the conventional pigments for Christmas, but add them to some reds and greens and use the familiar shapes of ornaments and boxes and it’s a sign of the season.

Valentines day anyone?

Valentines day anyone?

Easter baskets to fill

Easter baskets to fill

 

All by switching the colors used in ads, our thoughts are set in motion to respond to the message, either conscientiously or not, cultural commercial use of color surrounds us.

 

I challenge you to go out into the mall, if you dare, and take note of the seasonal influences of color and how closely it ties to your emotions and your wallet. Pay attention to what certain colors make you feel or think. The power of color is undeniable.G

In my next post, I will share with you some of the information I’ve gathered about the use of color in commercial logos and designs. What do the  “Golden Arches” really mean?

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving to all who stumble here. A few images of things I am thankful for:

New York City Skyline

New York City Skyline

 

summer flowers

Summer flowers at Hutchings Greenhouse, Eddington ME

 

Background smooth rocks

 

Shell in the tide at Biddeford Pool

Shell in the tide at Biddeford Pool

 

My sweet little boy Maine coon cat

My sweet little boy Maine coon cat

 

My mother as a child

My mother as a child

 

 

Chairs in the water at Long Pond

Chairs in the water at Long Pond

 

My girl

My girl

 

Lots of love in my life

Lots of love in my life

 

 

My husband

My husband

 

Wishing you all a wonderful holiday—take time to consider your blessings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall Family Fun Photos…I shoot people.

One loved kid - Chance with his parents, Rich & Lisa

One loved kid – Chance with his parents, Rich & Lisa

 

Fall is a great time for family portraits. Though I’m more likely to be photographing foliage or pumpkins this time of year, shooting people can be fun. The crisp blue sky, vibrant harvested fruit and gourds, and the autumn leaves as a backdrop, I dare you to get yourself to an orchard and NOT take photos.

 

So I was thrilled that my friend Rich asked me to shoot his family at an orchard and pumpkin farm just a few miles out of town. I was familiar with Treworgy’s in Levant, Maine. Every other year or so for the past few years, I’d taken my daughter to pick apples, work our way through the corn maze, and probably end up with more pumpkins in the trunk than we have room for at home.

 

This day, a few weeks ago, had originally been forecaster to be dreary and rainy. Cloudy would be fine, but rain would force this shoot to be rescheduled, though I knew that Rich’s daughter and son in law would be leaving mid week and our busy days could deter this family portrait for another time. The weather turned out perfect for this. Too sunny almost (did I just say that?).

 

Here are some of my favorites from the day.  Enjoy!

Chance with his mother Lisa

Chance with his mother Lisa

 

I loved how these two laughed. A lot.

 

They brought props!

They brought props!

 

This is Chance with sister Jamie. Love the mustaches!

 

Fall Family Photos Fall Family Photos

 

Jamie and her husband Brandon… I love the story!

 

Fall Family Photos Fall Family Photos

 

This too — tells a story.

One of a kid who has been really good for an hour and is ready to bust loose.

 

Fall Family Photos Fall Family Photos

 

A couple more that I liked of the group..

 

Fall Family Photos Fall Family Photos

 

Good props at the orchard… Looks dangerous but made for fun framing..

 

Fall Family Photos Fall Family Photos

 

The vibrant chalkboard made for a fun and seasonal background for these shots.

 

We got some great shots in just an hour’s time. If you’re interested in having your family shot, please email me for a quote and more info.

 

Enjoy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYC Architectural Abstracts: A Photographic Walking Tour of New York City

 

New York City Skyline

New York City Skyline

 

The New York City skyline is recognizable to millions. The Empire State building, the Chrystler Building, the Brooklyn Bridge; the twin towers that stood and then were gone so noticeably and now a gleaming new spire atop the Freedom Tower. The buildings together as a unit create the famous silhouette perched on the Manhattan Schist.

On a trip to New York in June, as in previous visits to the city, I found myself draw to the details of these landmarks. From afar, these are blurred, like the individual intricate leaves of autumn, they get lost in the power of the mass impact.

From my view at five foot two inches, I turned my camera lens to some of these amazing elements of design and history. Whether form or function, each section points to an aspect of the rich culture, of glamor and competition, of glory and achievement, and becomes the mark on the world that its architect intended.

Here are a few of the images from those days in June.

Waldorf Astoria Art Deco

Waldorf Astoria Art Deco

The ornately so beautiful design work over the main entrance of the historic Waldorf Astoria Hotel.

Mosaic in Waldorf Astoria lobby

Mosaic in Waldorf Astoria lobby

So amazing… the detail in this design is incredible.

 

The old and the new living peacefully

The old and the new living peacefully

A little further down the street, this centuries old synagogue seems dwarfed yet powerful in the neighborhood.

 

Windows in windows

Windows in windows

 

The reflections and juxtaposition of modern building styles with older brickwork.

 

New into old

New into old

 

Windows of the Chrysler building

Windows of the Chrysler building

This was a lesson in history and design in America.

Design in lobby of Chrysler building

Design in lobby of Chrysler building

This is a slice of the art deco over the interior doorways in the lobby of the Chrysler building.

Chrystler building details

Chrysler building details

This is a portion of the granite of the lobby walls as it reaches to the ceiling.

Flags reflected in windows

Flags reflected in windows

 

Sunset near 9th ave

Sunset near 9th ave

 

Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall

 

All of these images are available in my places/new york gallery.

 

The Best Camera

Celeste Cota Photography

Crossing the Brooklyn Bridge

“The best camera is the one that’s with you” is a quote by photographer Chase Jarvis. As my photo equipment stockpile has grown over the past few years, there are times it seems that carrying everything I need to capture an image is just plain exhausting. Weighty DSLR, filters, batteries, zoom lens, hot shoe flash . . . Is it all necessary?

Another question I have to ask is “Does it really lead to the best images?” What about the ones you miss because you left the “good” camera at home, nice and safe.

Have you ever found yourself eying a scene and cursing the fact that you didn’t bring your camera? For many, the thought of shooting it doesn’t cross their minds. For me, a missed shot will haunt me all day.

Celeste Cota Photography

Buildings in Little Italy

My husband and I recently went to New York City for a few days. We had decided this would be a very casual, low budget, backpacking kind of getaway. As soon as he mentioned that he didn’t think we’d need to check a bag for the flight, I started to panic. How could I shoot the city without all my stuff?

It was a pretty bare bones long weekend and was really fun, despite my anxiety about my perceived lack of photographic gadgetry. I did bring my Canon DSLR, but no zoom, just a polarizer filter, spare battery, battery charger, and a fistful of SD cards. I got some good shots and overall was pretty happy with the couple thousand images I came home with. While there in New York, we went to the B & H retail store. This was prompted by a discussion about getting a smaller, lighter camera for our upcoming family vacation. Theme park, waterslide, beaches . . . all places you don’t want to be bogged down with camera equipment but …. the potential for family candids and lights and sunsets and quirky finds is endless. I knew that I would be frustrated with a regular point and shoot camera. No viewfinder, no RAW capture, no CMOS sensor, no manual focus ability and the worst . .  shutter lag. So our trip to B & H was informative and I got to hold a few cameras in my hands. Discussing my requirements with one of the staff there got me to check out the Canon SX50 HS.

Compact and lightweight and meeting my demands, I decided to sleep on it – and to look to sell my older DSLR in order to pay its $359 price tag. Sold the old Rebel and bought the SX50HS and will soon embark on a road trip with the family where I’ll really get to try it out.

Celeste Cota Photography

The Brooklyn Bridge from Brooklyn

So, back to the quote ….. I’ve found that having a good camera isn’t good at all if its size, bulk, weight, or whatever tend to have you leave it at home, leaving you without a camera – when you see something you need to shoot. I’m hoping that my new little compact Canon will fill the gap, allow me to create quality shots despite the smaller size and price.

Thinking about this reminds me of some of the shots I have just because I had a camera with me. There are opportunities you create when you intentionally photograph something and then there are things that just happen and you’re lucky enough to be there to catch it.

This is one of my favorite shots from a trip we took to Hollywood a few years ago. Yeah, I got some of the costumed  characters out on the walk of fame, but it was only a quick eye and shooting from the hip (literally) that got this shot.

Celeste Cota Photography

Coffee break behind Chinese Theater in Hollywood.

 

There are times, too, when the potential of a photograph would be lost if I were to haul out my larger “serious” camera, like this one in Hollywood. Had I brought the camera up to eye level, focused, shot, this whole scene could be disrupted and ruined if I had been seen.

Here’s another example of shooting from the hip – while in New York a few weeks ago, we went to Chinatown for lunch. Afterwards we walked around a bit. The open markets are amazing and colorful, but watched over with the owner’s keen eye. It felt intrusive and unwelcomed for me to frame the scene and shoot with my DSLR. I took a quick shot here and there.

Chinatown market

Chinatown market

So I think that having a smaller, lighter camera will be a benefit in many ways – I believe I will be more likely to carry it with me regularly (I got a cute camera bag for it too!). I also think that for street shooting, I might be able to get more if I don’t appear to be a “professional” photographer. Sometimes people are squeamish about being photographed, whether it’s them or their stuff. Looking like every other tourist could lead to more options. Last, I think that a lightweight, smaller camera that I can stick in my tote bag without much fuss and take to the theme parks and boardwalks will allow me to experience these places differently.

The best camera is the one that’s with you.

 

Celeste Cota Photography

LA Palm trees as shot from the car window

 

 

 

Summer Flowers – Bright new photography

summer flowers

Orange Gerber daisy on sunny windowsill

Summer flowers are one of the joys of this season. My list of summer pleasures is a long one. Here, in today’s post, I want to share a few recent photographs of summer flowers.

 

summer flowers

A sea of pink flowers

 

My friend offered me a ride back to her house. We were planning an evening of barbeque’d food and good friends. On the way, she stopped into this greenhouse in Eddington, ME – Hutchings Greenhouse – to see if they had more gerber daisies. Of course I had my camera and couldn’t stop shooting. The colors of the flowers, with the greenhouses in rows, and the bright nursery carts, I shot some joyous summer blooms.

summer flowers

Flowers in the greenhouse

 

summer flowers

Almost summer in the greenhouse

 

I wanted to share these for a few reasons:

  • Summer flowers are one of the reasons I love summer
  • I would not have stopped at this green house had I driven myself to their house. So, accepting her kind offer of a ride, was a benefit for a few reasons.
  • If I had not had my camera with me, I could not have made these images. I had actually considered leaving it at home. I had a lot of other stuff to carry and don’t often use it when I go there. This time I did and it paid off.
  • I want to encourage you to stop into your local greenhouse. It’s easy to pick up flowers for summer at the big box parking lot, but places like this won’t be around if Lowe’s and Home Depot keep getting all the business.

summer flowers

Summer flowers at Hutchings Greenhouse, Eddington ME

Etsy Treasury Feature: Colorful Veggie Display

Colorful Vegetable Display

Colorful Vegetable Display

There are so many reasons I love Etsy, the online handmade marketplace. One of the reasons is that others can put together collections of items available on the site and share them as a treasury. Good keywording and visual appeal help to get your items found and selected.

One of my listings, a print I have for sale titled “Colorful Vegetable Display 8 x 10 Print” has been featured in a recent treasury.

I thought I’d share the collection with you. Here is the link: EAT YOUR VEGGIES.

Go ahead and explore. Etsy is a great place to find gifts – Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Graduation – any gift giving occasion.  It’s also perfectly acceptable to buy something for yourself . . . to decorate your kitchen perhaps . . . like a “Colorful Vegetable Display 8 x 10 Print”.

Shameless self promotion ahead: Use coupon code MYMOM and receive 15% off of your order of any item at my online shop.

Have a wonderful weekend everyone!

 

 

 

 

Blog Challenge Feature: New England Crafters

Lupine Leaves with Raindrops

Lupine Leaves with Raindrops

Nice surprise for a Monday morning . . . I received a notice from Kris at New England Crafters via Etsy that one of the photos on they Etsy site has been included in their weekly blog challenge. The topic was Earth Day with a focus on green.

Here is a link to their blog:  New England Crafters

Very cool.

This is the image link to my Etsy store: Feels Like Spring Lupine Leaves with raindrops

Thanks for the feature!!

For more botanical, green, floral and other earthy images, check out my botanical gallery.